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Fat

In light of recent scientific evidence based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses, it appears that saturated fat, found in milk products, are not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, there are substantial differences between the trans fats that occur naturally in ruminant fats (like CLA) and those derived from vegetable fats and oils.

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  • Dietary Sources of Saturated Fat May Influence Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    Current dietary recommendations focus on reducing saturated fat intake to lower cardiovascular disease risk. Yet, recent studies suggest that the link between saturated fat intake and cardiovascular disease risk may not be so straightforward. Data now indicate that the food source of...

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  • Saturated Fat and Cardiovascular Diseases: The Role of Milk Products in Reducing Risk

    Current dietary recommendations advocate reducing saturated fatty acid intake to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that milk products, including cheese, may reduce cardiovascular disease risk despite their saturated fatty acid...

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  • Saturated Fat and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

    Several studies including randomized clinical trials have investigated the role of saturated fat in cardiovascular disease risk factors, particularly blood lipid markers. The evidence suggests that saturated fat may not be detrimental to cardiovascular risk factors. HighlightsEvidence...

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  • Types of Saturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease

    Recent research suggests that saturated fatty acids do not all have the same effect on cardiovascular health. Saturated fatty acids such as stearic acid and fatty acids found in milk and milk products appear to be beneficial and may diminish the risk for cardiovascular disease. ...

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  • Replacement of Saturated Fat with Other Nutrients

    Current nutritional guidelines recommend decreasing saturated fat intake to improve blood lipids and reduce cardiovascular risk. However, the effect on cardiovascular health may vary depending on which nutrient replaces saturated fat in the diet, e.g., omega-3 or omega-6 polyunsaturated...

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  • Natural Trans Fats

    There are substantial differences between the natural trans fats in fats from ruminants (cows, sheep, goats) and the trans fats in industrially produced vegetable fats and oils. The hydrogenation process is radically different, as are the types and amounts of trans fats created....

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  • The Facts on Natural Trans Fats and Cardiovascular Disease

    It is well established that industrial trans fats increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. The effects of natural trans fats, particularly ruminant fats, are less clear. Current evidence suggests that ruminant trans fats are not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In fact, emerging evidence suggests a beneficial effect of specific ruminant trans fatty acids on cardiovascular health.

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  • Trans Fats in the Canadian Diet

    Industrial trans fats are fats formed when liquid oils are made into semi-solid or solid fats, such as shortening and hard margarine, during a process called hydrogenation. Most of the trans fat in a typical Canadian diet come from hard margarines, and commercially fried foods and...

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  • What is CLA?

    Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) refers to a group of naturally occurring isomers of linoleic acid present in ruminant fats and dairy products. Unlike industrial trans fatty acids, trans CLA may be of great potential benefit to human health.

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  • The Effects of CLA on Health

    For the past two decades, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has attracted significant research interest due to its favourable potential effects on health. While studies are still in their early phase, published reviews on CLA have highlighted the benefits of this natural ruminant fat.

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What's New

Saturated Fat and Cardiovascular Disease: Where Are We?

While a lowered intake of saturated fat has commonly been indicated for improved cardiovascular health, evidence from recent studies such as systematic reviews, meta-analyses and prospective cohort...

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Milk Products and Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

The relationship between milk product consumption and type 2 diabetes has been examined in several meta-analyses. Evidence to date suggests that milk product consumption is associated with a reduced...

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Lactose Intolerance: Health Authorities' Recommendations

Several authorities such as the National Institutes of Health, the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition, and the National Medical Association recommend that milk and milk products...

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Osteoporosis and Fractures Are Under-Recognized Among Asians

There is a growing concern about osteoporosis and fractures among Asian populations. Although milk products can help prevent osteoporosis, they are under-consumed by these population groups.

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Protein and Healthy Aging: Optimal Muscle Mass for Life

Our muscles are constantly in balance between anabolism (growth) and catabolism (breakdown). For anabolism to take place, we need to fuel muscles with protein. Exercise also gives muscles a further...

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